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Home > Mesothelioma additional information > Mesothelioma clinical trials

Mesothelioma clinical trials

A mesothelioma clinical trial (also clinical research) is a research study in human volunteers to answer specific health questions. Carefully conducted clinical trials are the fastest and safest way to find treatments that work in people and ways to improve health. Interventional trials determine whether experimental treatments or new ways of using known therapies are safe and effective under controlled environments. Observational trials address health issues in large groups of people or populations in natural settings.

The benefits of participating in a clinical trial include the following:

  • Participants have access to promising new approaches that are often not available outside the clinical trial setting.
  • The approach being studied may be more effective than the standard approach.
  • Participants receive regular and careful medical attention from a research team that includes doctors and other health professionals.
  • Participants may be the first to benefit from the new method under study.
  • Results from the study may help others in the future.

The possible risks of participating in a clinical trial include the following:

  • New drugs or procedures under study are not always better than the standard care to which they are being compared.
  • New treatments may have side effects or risks that doctors do not expect or that are worse than standard care.
  • Participants in randomized trials will not be able to choose the approach they receive.
  • Health insurance and managed care providers may not cover all patient care costs in a study.
  • Participants may be required to make more visits to the doctor than they would if they were not in the clinical trial.

Ideas for clinical trials usually come from researchers. After researchers test new therapies or procedures in the laboratory and in animal studies, the treatments with the most promising laboratory results are moved into clinical trials. During a mesothelioma clinical trial, more and more information is gained about a new treatment, its risks and how well it may or may not work.

Clinical trials are sponsored or funded by a variety of organizations or individuals such as physicians, medical institutions, foundations, voluntary groups, and pharmaceutical companies, in addition to federal agencies such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Department of Defense (DOD), and the Department of Veteran's Affairs (VA). Trials can take place in a variety of locations, such as hospitals, universities, doctors' offices, or community clinics.

The clinical trial process depends on the kind of trial being conducted (See What are the different types of clinical trials?) The clinical trial team includes doctors and nurses as well as social workers and other health care professionals. They check the health of the participant at the beginning of the trial, give specific instructions for participating in the trial, monitor the participant carefully during the trial, and stay in touch after the trial is completed.

Some clinical trials involve more tests and doctor visits than the participant would normally have for an illness or condition. For all types of trials, the participant works with a research team. Mesothelioma clinical trial participation is most successful when the protocol is carefully followed and there is frequent contact with the research staff.

There are several types of clinical trials:

Prevention trials study ways to reduce the risk, or chance, of developing cancer. Most prevention trials are conducted with healthy people who have not had cancer. Some trials are conducted with people who have had cancer and want to prevent the return of cancer (recurrence), or reduce the chance of developing a new type of cancer.

Screening trials study ways to detect cancer. They are often conducted to determine whether finding cancer before it causes symptoms decreases the chance of dying from the disease. These trials involve people who do not have any symptoms of cancer.

Diagnostic trials study tests or procedures that could be used to identify cancer more accurately and at an earlier stage. Diagnostic trials usually include people who have signs or symptoms of cancer.

Treatment trials are conducted with people who have cancer. They are designed to answer specific questions about, and evaluate the effectiveness of, a new treatment or a new way of using a standard treatment. These trials test many types of treatments, such as new drugs, vaccines, new approaches to surgery or radiation therapy, or new combinations of treatments.

Supportive care (or quality of life) trials explore ways to improve the comfort and quality of life of cancer patients and cancer survivors. These trials may study ways to help people who are experiencing nausea, vomiting, sleep disorders, depression, or other effects from cancer or its treatment.

Genetics studies are sometimes part of another cancer clinical trial. The genetics component of the trial may focus on how genetic makeup can affect detection, diagnosis, or response to cancer treatment.

Population and family-based genetic research studies differ from traditional cancer clinical trials. In these studies, researchers look at tissue or blood samples, generally from families or large groups of people, to find genetic changes that are associated with cancer. People who participate in genetics studies may or may not have cancer, depending on the study. The goal of these studies is to help understand the role of genes in the development of cancer.

What are the phases of clinical trials?

Clinical trials are conducted in phases. The trials at each phase have a different purpose and help scientists answer different questions:

There are some phases of clinical trials in which a treatment is studied before the treatment is eligible for approval by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration).

phase I trial
The first step in testing a new treatment in humans. These studies test the best way to give a new treatment (for example, by mouth, intravenous infusion, or injection) and the best dose. The dose is usually increased a little at a time in order to find the highest dose that does not cause harmful side effects. Because little is known about the possible risks and benefits of the treatments being tested, phase I trials usually include only a small number of patients who have not been helped by other treatments. The purpose of a Phase I study is to find the best way to give a new treatment and how much of it can be given safely. Physicians watch patients carefully for any harmful side effects. The research treatment has been well tested in laboratory and animal studies, but the side effects in patients are not completely predictable.

phase I/II trial
A trial to study the safety, dosage levels, and response to a new treatment.

phase II trial A study to test whether a new treatment has an anticancer effect (for example, whether it shrinks a tumor or improves blood test results) and whether it works against a certain type of cancer. Phase II trials determine the effectiveness of a research treatment after safety has been evaluated in a Phase I trial. Patients are closely observed for an anticancer effect by careful measurement of cancer sites present at the beginning of the trial. In addition to monitoring patients for response, any side effects are carefully recorded and assessed.

phase II/III trial
A trial to study response to a new treatment and the effectiveness of the treatment compared with the standard treatment regimen.

phase III trial
A study to compare the results of people taking a new treatment with the results of people taking the standard treatment (for example, which group has better survival rates or fewer side effects). In most cases, studies move into phase III only after a treatment seems to work in phases I and II. Phase III trials may include hundreds of people. Phase III trials require entry of large numbers of patients; some trials enroll thousands of patients. One of the groups may receive standard (the most accepted) treatment, so the new treatments can be directly compared. The group that receives the standard treatment is called the "control group. " For example, one group of patients (the control group) may receive the standard chemotherapy for a certain type of cancer, while another patient group may receive another type of chemotherapy that may or may not contain an investigational drug to see if this improves survival. All patients in Phase III trials are monitored closely for side effects, and treatment is discontinued if the side effects are too severe.

phase IV trial
After a treatment has been approved and is being marketed, it is studied in a phase IV trial to evaluate side effects that were not apparent in the phase III trial. Thousands of people are involved in a phase IV trial.

Non-Drug Related Clinical Trials

Non-drug related clinical trials are much the same as drug clinical trials with the exception that they do not always require FDA approval. Whereas drug clinical trials consist of four phases, non-drug related clinical trials typically consist of three.

Although the FDA does not regulate the development of new treatment modalities, it does regulate any newly developed medical devices used in the practice of such treatments. For example, the development of a new surgical procedure aimed at curing malignant mesothelioma is not regulated by the FDA; however, a newly developed surgical tool used to perform the surgery does require FDA approval. The FDA approves the safety and efficacy of the device as opposed to the safety and efficacy of the treatment.

The Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation (MARF) lists mesothelioma clinical trials on their site. Once you find a trial on one of these web sites that seems like it might be beneficial, you should call the center where it's being conducted to find out as much as you can about the risks, potential benefits, eligibility requirements, and costs and then discuss the suitability of the trial with your medical team and your family or close friends. If they have other questions you didn't think of, call back and ask the center conducting the test.

The same clinical trial may be conducted at various locations so be sure to ask for all locations. You may find a location close to home, or close to the homes of relatives or friends with whom you can stay during treatment. It is certainly convenient to find clinical trials close to home, but remember there are organizations that can help you with travel expenses and a place to stay.

Costs

The cost of clinical trials can be tricky and it's important to determine who pays for what.

There are two types of costs in clinical studies:

  • patient care costs
  • research costs

Patient care costs are generally those which you would have even if you were receiving traditional treatment, such as doctor visits, hospital stays, lab tests, x-rays, and the like. The patient is usually responsible for these costs and you need to determine whether your insurer will pay for them.

Often, the cost of investigational drugs and research costs, such as tests performed solely for research purposes, are covered by the sponsor of a clinical trial but you should always check which costs are covered by the sponsor and which are not.

Medicare reimburses certain patient care costs in clinical trials. See their website or call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227). In NCI-sponsored trials, TRICARE, the Department of Defense's healthcare program covers certain patient care costs and the VA covers certain costs for eligible veterans. See the cancer.gov website for more information.

Some states now require coverage of patient care costs (not research costs) in certain clinical trials. Click here to see if your state has laws that may help.

The NCI sponsors clinical trials around the country. There is no charge for medical care at NCI-sponsored clinical trials at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland but patients are responsible for travel costs for their initial screening visit. Usually, once a patient is enrolled in a trial there, the NCI covers transportation costs for all later visits for patients who do not live locally and these patients usually receive a small daily amount for food and lodging expenses if they are being treated as outpatients. You can search their site for more information.

Note: different websites have different information, so look everywhere and call to find out as much as you can about what's available.

Who Sponsors Clinical Trials? Who Conducts Them?

Of the thousands of cancer clinical trials going on at any one time, the US National Cancer Institute (NCI), a part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), sponsors (pays for the costs of) a good portion of them. These studies are often run by NCI-sponsored cancer cooperative groups, which are networks of doctors and institutions across the country who specialize in a particular aspect of cancer.

There are currently 10 major cooperative groups conducting studies:

  • American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN)
  • American College of Surgeons Oncology Group (ACOSOG)
  • Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB)
  • Children's Oncology Group (COG)
  • Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG)
  • Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG)
  • National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP)
  • North Central Cancer Treatment Group (NCCTG)
  • Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)
  • Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG)

The other main sponsors of clinical trials are pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, which must show that their medicines are safe and effective before they can be marketed. Other groups, such as some nonprofit organizations, also sponsor clinical trials.

Researchers conduct clinical trials in many different settings. Major cancer centers are the most common; because they usually have the most advanced facilities and highly trained staffs, they can conduct all phases of clinical trials. But they are not the only places where these studies take place.

Community hospitals across the country also participate in clinical trials, although these are usually phase II or III studies. Many of these hospitals are part of the NCIís Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP). CCOP members conduct the same clinical trials across the country. Community hospitals may conduct other, privately sponsored, studies as well.

Doctors in private practice can also be involved in clinical trials, either as members of cooperative groups or by being actively involved in private research. But many doctors decide not to conduct clinical research, for a variety of reasons.

Location and Contact Information

Location Contact information
United States, Alaska Alaska Regional Hospital Cancer Center, Anchorage, Alaska, 99508, United States; Recruiting
Saul E. Rivkin, MD 206-386-2929
United States, Arizona Arizona Cancer Center at University of Arizona Health Sciences Center, Tucson, Arizona, 85724-5024, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - Arizona Cancer Center 520-626-9008
United States, California Providence Saint Joseph Medical Center - Burbank, Burbank, California, 91505, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - Providence Saint Joseph Medical Cente 818-847-3220
University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, California, 95817, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - University of California Davis Cancer 916-734-3089
USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center and Hospital, Los Angeles, California, 90089-9181, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Cente 323-865-0451
United States, Georgia Curtis & Elizabeth Anderson Cancer Institute at Memorial Health University Medical Center, Savannah, Georgia, 31403-3089, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - Curtis & Elizabeth Anderson Cancer In 912-350-8568
Northeast Georgia Medical Center, Gainesville, Georgia, 30501, United States; Recruiting
Charles H. Nash, MD 770-535-3553
United States, Illinois Cardinal Bernardin Cancer Center at Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois, 60153, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - Cardinal Bernardin Cancer Center 708-226-4357
Decatur Memorial Hospital Cancer Care Institute, Decatur, Illinois, 62526, United States; Recruiting
James L. Wade, MD 217-876-6600
Regional Cancer Center at Memorial Medical Center, Springfield, Illinois, 62781-0001, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - Regional Cancer Center 217-788-4233
United States, Indiana Reid Hospital & Health Care Services, Incorporated, Richmond, Indiana, 47374, United States; Recruiting
Howard M. Gross, MD 765-983-3000
St. Francis Hospital and Health Centers - Beech Grove Campus, Beech Grove, Indiana, 46107, United States; Recruiting
Howard M. Gross, MD 317-787-3311
United States, Iowa Genesis Regional Cancer Center at Genesis Medical Center, Davenport, Iowa, 52803, United States; Recruiting
George Kovach, MD 563-421-1960
United States, Kansas Kansas Masonic Cancer Research Institute at the University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, 66160-7357, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - Kansas Masonic Cancer Research Instit 913-588-4709
Tammy Walker Cancer Center at Salina Regional Health Center, Salina, Kansas, 67401, United States; Recruiting
William F. Cathcart-Rake, MD 785-827-7261
United States, Massachusetts Cancer Research Center at Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, 02118, United States; Recruiting
Ken S. Zaner, MD, PhD 617-638-5631
Caritas St. Elizabeth's Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, 02135-2997, United States; Recruiting
Paul J. Hesketh, MD 617-789-2317
United States, Michigan Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, Michigan, 48201-1379, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute 800-527-6266
CCOP - Michigan Cancer Research Consortium, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48106, United States; Recruiting
Philip J. Stella, MD 877-590-5995
Foote Hospital, Jackson, Michigan, 49201, United States; Recruiting
Philip J. Stella, MD 517-788-4800
Genesys Hurley Cancer Institute, Flint, Michigan, 48503, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - Genesys Hurley Cancer Institute 810-762-8057
Hurley Medical Center, Flint, Michigan, 48503, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - Hurley Medical Center 810-762-8057
Josephine Ford Cancer Center at Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan, 48202, United States; Recruiting
Robert A. Chapman, MD 313-916-1850
Oakwood Cancer Center at Oakwood Hospital and Medical Center, Dearborn, Michigan, 48123-2500, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - Oakwood Cancer Center 313-593-8090
Saint Joseph Mercy Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48106-0995, United States; Recruiting
Philip J. Stella, MD 734-712-5658
Seton Cancer Institute - Saginaw, Saginaw, Michigan, 48601, United States; Recruiting
Oncology Research Center 989-776-8411
Sparrow Regional Cancer Center, Lansing, Michigan, 48909, United States; Recruiting
Philip J. Stella, MD 517-364-2780
St. John Macomb Hospital, Warren, Michigan, 48093, United States; Recruiting
Philip J. Stella, MD 586-573-5757
University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109-0942, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - University of Michigan Comprehensive 800-865-1125
Van Elslander Cancer Center at St. John Hospital and Medical Center, Grosse Pointe Woods, Michigan, 48236, United States; Recruiting
Clincial Trials Office - Van Elslander Cancer Center 313-343-3166
United States, Missouri CCOP - Cancer Research for the Ozarks, Springfield, Missouri, 65802, United States; Recruiting
John W. Goodwin, MD 417-889-8099
CCOP - Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri, 64131, United States; Recruiting
Rakesh Gaur, MD 816-823-0555
Hulston Cancer Center at Cox Medical Center South, Springfield, Missouri, 65807, United States; Recruiting
John W. Goodwin, MD 417-889-8099
Saint Louis University Cancer Center, Saint Louis, Missouri, 63110, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - St. Louis University Cancer Center 314-977-4440
St. John's Regional Health Center, Springfield, Missouri, 65804, United States; Recruiting
John W. Goodwin, MD 417-889-8099
United States, Montana Great Falls, Montana, 59405, United States; Recruiting
Donald H. Berdeaux, MD, FACP 406-452-4322
Big Sky Oncology, Great Falls, Montana, 59405, United States; Recruiting
Grant W. Harrer, MD, FACP, CCTI 406-455-2820
Billings Clinic Cancer Center, Billings, Montana, 59107-5100, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - Billings Clinic Cancer Center 800-996-2663 [email protected]
Bozeman Deaconess Cancer Center, Bozeman, Montana, 59715, United States; Recruiting
Contact Person 406-585-5000
CCOP - Montana Cancer Consortium, Billings, Montana, 59101, United States; Recruiting
Contact Person 406-259-2245
Community Medical Center, Missoula, Montana, 59801, United States; Recruiting
Contact Person 406-728-4100
Deaconess Billings Clinic - Downtown, Billings, Montana, 59107-7000, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - Deaconess Billings Clinic - Downtown 800-996-2663 [email protected]
Glacier Oncology, PLLC, Kalispell, Montana, 59901, United States; Recruiting
Contact Person 406-752-7600
Great Falls Clinic, Great Falls, Montana, 59405, United States; Recruiting
Thomas A. Warr, MD 406-727-4584
Guardian Oncology and Center for Wellness, Missoula, Montana, 59804, United States; Recruiting
Contact Person 406-721-1118
Hematology-Oncology Centers of the Northern Rockies - Billings, Billings, Montana, 59101, United States; Recruiting
Contact Person 406-238-6290
Kalispell Medical Oncology, Kalispell, Montana, 59901, United States; Recruiting
Contact Person 406-752-8900
Kalispell Regional Medical Center, Kalispell, Montana, 59901, United States; Recruiting
Contact Person 406-752-5111
Montana Cancer Center at St. Patrick Hospital and Health Sciences Center, Missoula, Montana, 59807, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - Montana Cancer Center 406-329-7029
Montana Cancer Specialists at Montana Cancer Center, Missoula, Montana, 59807-7877, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - Montana Cancer Specialists 406-238-6962
Northern Rockies Radiation Oncology Center, Billings, Montana, 59101, United States; Recruiting
Contact Person 406-248-2212
Sletten Regional Cancer Institute at Benefis Healthcare, Great Falls, Montana, 59405, United States; Recruiting
Grant W. Harrer, MD, FACP, CCTI 406-455-2820
St. James Community Hospital, Butte, Montana, 59701, United States; Recruiting
Contact Person 406-782-8361
St. Peter's Hospital, Helena, Montana, 59601, United States; Recruiting
Contact Person 406-442-2480
St. Vincent Healthcare, Billings, Montana, 59101, United States; Recruiting
Contact Person 406-657-7000
United States, New Mexico University of New Mexico Cancer Research and Treatment Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 87131-5636, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - University of New Mexico Cancer Resea 505-272-6972
United States, North Carolina Presbyterian Cancer Center at Presbyterian Hospital, Charlotte, North Carolina, 28233-3549, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - Presbyterian Cancer Center 704-384-5369
Rutherford Hospital, Rutherfordton, North Carolina, 28139, United States; Recruiting
James D. Bearden, MD 864-560-6812
Wayne Memorial Hospital, Incorporated, Goldsboro, North Carolina, 27534, United States; Recruiting
Contact Person 919-736-1110
United States, Ohio CCOP - Dayton, Dayton, Ohio, 45429, United States; Recruiting
Howard M. Gross, MD 937-395-8678
Charles F. Kettering Memorial Hospital, Kettering, Ohio, 45429, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - Charles F. Kettering Memorial Hospita 937-298-3399 ext. 55506
Cleveland Clinic - Wooster, Wooster, Ohio, 44691, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - Cleveland Clinic - Wooster 800-862-7798
Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio, 44195, United States; Recruiting
George T. Budd, MD 216-444-7923
Community Oncology Group at Cleveland Clinic Cancer Center, Independence, Ohio, 44131, United States; Recruiting
George T. Budd, MD 216-447-9747
David L. Rike Cancer Center at Miami Valley Hospital, Dayton, Ohio, 45409, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - David L. Rike Cancer Center 937-208-2079
Good Samaritan Hospital, Dayton, Ohio, 45406, United States; Recruiting
Howard M. Gross, MD 937-278-2612
Grandview Hospital, Dayton, Ohio, 45405, United States; Recruiting
Howard M. Gross, MD 937-226-3200
Middletown Regional Hospital, Middletown, Ohio, 45044, United States; Recruiting
Howard M. Gross, MD 513-424-2111
Ruth G. McMillan Cancer Center at Greene Memorial Hospital, Xenia, Ohio, 45385, United States; Recruiting
Howard M. Gross, MD 937-352-2140
Samaritan North Cancer Care Center, Dayton, Ohio, 45415, United States; Recruiting
Howard M. Gross, MD 937-279-5800
UVMC Cancer Care Center at Upper Valley Medical Center, Troy, Ohio, 45373-1300, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - UVMC Cancer Care Center 937-440-4842
Veterans Affairs Medical Center - Dayton, Dayton, Ohio, 45428, United States; Recruiting
Howard M. Gross, MD 937-268-6511
United States, Oregon St. Charles Medical Center - Bend, Bend, Oregon, 97701, United States; Recruiting
Robert Boone, MD 541-317-4298
United States, South Carolina AnMed Cancer Center, Anderson, South Carolina, 29621, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - Rose Ramer Cancer Clinic 864-261-2099
Bon Secours St. Francis Health System, Greenville, South Carolina, 29601, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trails Office - Bon Secours St. Francis Health System 864-255-1713
CCOP - Greenville, Greenville, South Carolina, 29615, United States; Recruiting
Jeffrey K. Giguere, MD, FACP 864-241-6251
CCOP - Upstate Carolina, Spartanburg, South Carolina, 29303, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - CCOP - Upstate Carolina 800-486-5941
Gibbs Regional Cancer Center at Spartanburg Regional Medical Center, Spartanburg, South Carolina, 29303, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - Gibbs Regional Cancer Center 800-486-5941
Roper St. Francis Cancer Center at Roper Hospital, Charleston, South Carolina, 29401, United States; Recruiting
James M. Orcutt, MD 843-577-2276
United States, Tennessee Christine LaGuardia Phillips Cancer Center at Wellmont Holston Valley Medical Center, Kingsport, Tennessee, 37662, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - Christine LaGuardia Phillips Cancer C 423-224-5593
United States, Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center at University of Texas, Houston, Texas, 77030-4009, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - M.D. Anderson Cancer Center 713-792-3245
United States, Utah American Fork Hospital, American Fork, Utah, 84003, United States; Recruiting
W. G. Harker, MD 801-269-0231
Cottonwood Hospital Medical Center, Murray, Utah, 84107, United States; Recruiting
W. G. Harker, MD 801-269-0231
Dixie Regional Medical Center - East Campus, Saint George, Utah, 84770, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - Dixie Regional Medical Center 435-688-4167
Latter Day Saints Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah, 84103, United States; Recruiting
W. G. Harker, MD 801-269-0231
Logan Regional Hospital, Logan, Utah, 84321, United States; Recruiting
W. G. Harker, MD 801-269-0231
McKay-Dee Hospital Center, Ogden, Utah, 84403, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - McKay-Dee Hospital Center 801-387-7426
Utah Cancer Specialists at UCS Cancer Center, Salt Lake City, Utah, 84106, United States; Recruiting
W. G. Harker, MD 801-269-0231
Utah Valley Regional Medical Center - Provo, Provo, Utah, 84604, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - Utah Valley Regional Medical Center - 801-357-7965
United States, Virginia Danville Regional Medical Center, Danville, Virginia, 24541, United States; Recruiting
Clinical Trials Office - Danville Regional Medical Center 434-799-3753
Southwest Virginia Regional Cancer Center, Norton, Virginia, 24273, United States; Recruiting
Malcolm R. Mathews, MD 423-224-3150
United States, Washington Columbia Basin Hematology, Kennewick, Washington, 99336, United States; Recruiting
Thomas A. Rado, MD, PhD 509-783-0144
United States, Wyoming Welch Cancer Center at Sheridan Memorial Hospital, Sheridan, Wyoming, 82801, United States; Recruiting
Contact Person 307-674-6022
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